some keening for this is my jam, a brilliant tool

This Is My Jam - TIMJ for short - is shutting down in a few weeks. Like everything else Team Jam has done, they're doing it in the right way, which means you'll be able to see all the archives. Here's mine. I've been posting to it for three and a half years, an eternity in web time, and long enough for me to sadly agree with Team Jam's reasons for discontinuing service. [When Vizify, another favorite and departed product, generated a page about what I tweeted about, "Jam" was at the top of the list.]

TIMJ was a successful experiment in the power of "slow sharing" - you could only share one song at a time and the songs expired after a week. Following enough people gave you a great page of Jams that'd get me unstuck when I was searching for a soundtrack. It was a great way to find new music or at least music new to you, probably the free web service I recommended people register for the most. TIMJ really simulated a real-life experience that I adore, no matter which side of it I'm on: "Listen to this song!"

A background generated from my current jam, Southern University's marching band playing Rae Sremmurd's "Throw Sum Mo".

A background generated from my current jam, Southern University's marching band playing Rae Sremmurd's "Throw Sum Mo".

I'm a compulsive journaler, perhaps because I don't have a great memory. I need to jot. My gut begins to churn if I go more than a week without journaling. But I don't look back at my journals with great frequency. They can be tough reads. I'd prefer to search a word on my Facebook or Twitter and be served a smattering of loosely connected memories. [More on that soon.]

This Is My Jam served as a great journal, one I delight in looking back on. I wish I'd had it my whole life. Songs tease out memories that words on paper or in pixels can't hope to reach.

I'm really looking forward to whatever Team Jam does next.